The Cocks and The Partridge

A Partridge put in with gamecocks watched them fight and worried for his safety. Not to worry he found out as game cocks fight each other all the time.

Some people quarrel just for the sake of quarreling.

Townsend VersionTownsend version

A man had two Gamecocks in his poultry-yard. One day by chance he found a tame Partridge for sale. He purchased it and brought it home to be reared with his Gamecocks. When the Partridge was put into the poultry-yard, they struck at it and followed it about, so that the Partridge became grievously troubled and supposed that he was thus evilly treated because he was a stranger. Not long afterwards he saw the Cocks fighting together and not separating before one had well beaten the other. He then said to himself, “I shall no longer distress myself at being struck at by these Gamecocks, when I see that they cannot even refrain from quarreling with each other.”

JBR CollectionJBR Collection

A certain man having taken a Partridge, cut his wings and put him into a little yard where he kept Game-Cocks. The Cocks were not at all civil to the new-comer, who at first put his treatment down to the fact of his being a stranger. When, however, he found that they frequently fought and nearly killed each other, he ceased to wonder that they did not respect him.

L'Estrange VersionL’Estrange version

A cock-master bought a partridge, and turn’d it among his fighting cocks, for them to feed together. The cocks beat the partridge away from their meat, which she lay’d the more to heart, because it look’d like an aversion to her purely as a stranger. But the partridge finding these very cocks afterwards, cutting one another to pieces, she comforted her self with this thought, that she had no reason to expect they should be kinder to her, than they were to one another.

Moral

‘Tis no wonder to find those people troublesome to strangers, that cannot agree among themselves. They quarrel for the love of quarreling; and provided the peace be broken, no matter upon what ground, or with whom.

1001Perdix et Galli

Cum quidam domi haberet gallos, mercatus est perdicem et eam dedit in societatem gallorum alendam et saginandam una cum eis. Galli, quisque pro se, mordebant, et eam abigebant. Perdix autem apud se afflictabatur, existimans talia sibi inferri a gallis quod suum genus alienum esset ab illorum genere. Vero ubi non multo post aspexit illos inter se pugnantes et mutuo percutientes, a maerore et tristitia recreata inquit, “Equidem post haec amplius non afflictabor, eos videns dimicantes etiam inter se.”

Perry #023