A Fisherman and His Bagpipe

A Fisherman played music to draw Fish but none came. Once he caught some they danced to his tune because they were under his control.

Stick to business you know.

Eliot-JacobsEliot/Jacobs Version

A Fisherman took his bagpipes to the river and played them hoping to catch fish with the melody. But, no fish responded. So, he cast his net into the river and soon drew it out filled with fish. When he again played, the fish in the net flopped in tune with the music.

“You dance now when I play,” the Fisherman said. “Yes,” said an old Fish: “When you are in a man’s power you must do as he bids you.”

Townsend VersionTownsend version

A Fisherman skilled in music took his flute and his nets to the seashore. Standing on a projecting rock, he played several tunes in the hope that the fish, attracted by his melody, would of their own accord dance into his net, which he had placed below. At last, having long waited in vain, he laid aside his flute, and casting his net into the sea, made an excellent haul of fish. When he saw them leaping about in the net upon the rock he said: “O you most perverse creatures, when I piped you would not dance, but now that I have ceased you do so merrily.” There are certain rules and methods for the doing of all things in this world; and therefore let every man stick to the business he understands, and was brought up to, without making one profession interfere with another.

L'Estrange VersionL’Estrange version

A fisherman that understood piping better than netting, set himself down upon the side of a river, and touch’d his flute, but not a fish came near him. Upon this, he layd down his pipe and cast his net, which brought him up a very great draught. The fish fell a frisking in the net, and the fisherman observing it; What sotts are these (says he) that would not dance when I play’d to ’em, and will be dancing now without musique!

Moral

There are certain rules and methods for the doing of all things in this world; and therefore let every man stick to the bus’ness he understands, and was brought up to, without making one profession interfere with another.

1001Piscator et Calamus

Piscator quidam iuxta maris litus sedit et coepit calamum inflare, putans cantu se pisces facile esse capturum. Cantu verum nil proficiente, calamum deposuit, rete in mare demisit, ac plurimos cepit pisces. Sed cum ex reti pisces extraheret atque eos saltantes videret, ait, “O improba animalia! Dum canebam, saltare noluistis; nunc autem, calamo cessante, saltus datis assiduos.”

Perry #011